Can I just use talcum powder instead of an antiperspirant?

      • Guest
        Jade on #3946

        Hi,

        As majority of us know, to eliminate unpleasant scents many people use talcum powder on their babies – especially when it is time to change their diapers. Talcum powder is by far effective primarily because it absorbs the oil and moisture in a person’s skin while still managing to protect it at the same time.

        Now my question is: Can I just use talcum powder instead of an antiperspirant? It is effective for the babies maybe it will also be effective in us adults? Any idea? I perspire a lot and I really need some sort of an advice.

        Regards,
        Jade

        Reply
      • Guest
        Jona Cruz on #4119

        Jade,

        Talcum powder alone is not as effective of an antiperspirant for an adult as it is for a young child.

        To eliminate unpleasant scents, parents frequently use talcum powder on their babies because it is so effective primarily as it absorbs the oil and moisture in a person’s skin while still managing to protect it at the same time. However, talcum powder alone is not as effective as antiperspirant for an adult. As your sweat glands and pores develop over time, perspiration and body odor intensify. Quite a few options include talcum powder as one of many different key ingredients listed.

        Hope this helps.

        -Jona

        Reply
      • Guest
        Rayray on #4188

        Excessive sweating almost never causes physical harm and the recommended treatment depends on your problem: soaked shirts, smell, or yellow armpit stains. You can reduce all of these to an extent with over the counter treatments and changed habits. If these don't do the job, there are many more treatments you can discuss with your doctor.

        Ordinary deodorant only hides smell. To stop soaking your clothes, you'll need a product with antiperspirant. If your armpits are sweaty, dry them first using a hair dryer on a cool-air setting. Most antiperspirants include aluminum compounds that can cause yellow armpit stains. Baby powder or talcum powder absorbs moisture, so it can prevent soaked clothing. This is generally not as effective as antiperspirant deodorant, but won't stain your clothes.

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      • Guest
        Marlissa on #4262

        Talcum powder is so fine that it can be easily inhaled, and it has been linked to breathing problems. There have also been preliminary studies showing that talcum powder use may be linked to a higher risk of some types of cancer. That's why you'll see talc-free, cornstarch-based baby powders on the market. They work just as well as talc-based powders.

        But no matter what kind of powder you use, it's important to know that none of them can actually stop sweating as well as an antiperspirant does. Powdering can also get messy and leave white streaks on your clothes. If you sweat a lot, you might end up with unsightly clumps of powder. Make sure that you're completely dry before powdering. While baby powder isn't really a substitute for antiperspirant, it can definitely help in the fight against sweat.

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      • Guest
        Olive on #5128

        Based on my experience, I have found that I smell more depending on what I have eaten. If I eat a lot of garlic or onions, it is a pretty sure bet I’m going to smell! I’ve stopped using antiperspirant within the last month and I have been powdering up with Johnson & Johnson’s Cornstarch Baby Powder. It covers the late afternoon smell for the most part. But baby powder, even the cornstarch kind, is not a good long-term alternative.

        And hey! If you are near a Trader Joe’s, they have an aluminium-free stick deodorant that has little cotton fibers in it.

        Reply
      • Guest
        Allen Moore on #5247

        I would not say that talcum powder and antiperspirant are interchangeable. I use a talcum powder product for areas of sweating that cause soreness and rawness,the one I use is called AntiMonkey Butt https://www.antimonkeybutt.com/13-men , it has calamine in it which moisturizes while it heals and protects the raw and cracked affected areas. But I do suffer from hyperhidrosis technically so I use an antiperspirant for my underarms, which is where I experience the most excessive sweating. I've tried a bunch but my favorite thus far is Certain Dri, they have 3 different products with different strengths that you can choose from for your own needs. You can see all 3 options here https://www.certaindri.com/content/15-products . I swear by these products and hope you give them a shot!! But all in all, talcum powder and antiperspirant are not interchangeable in my book. Different uses and applications!! Gotta use them in the ways they are most effective 🙂

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      • Guest
        Aguilus on #5631

        This is really no golden rule whether you will use talc or spray or roll on as long as it is effective, then go for it.

        Reply
      • Guest
        Angel on #5768

        Talc isn't really a substitute for antiperspirant, but baking soda is. Talc just absorbs wetness but it does not actually stops the process of sweating. Antiperspirant stops sweating and I've read that the best time to put on your antiperspirant is the night before to give it a chance to absorb and not necessarily right after the shower. Baking soda will not stop you from perspiring, but it will absorb wetness much better than talc and it is designed to neutralize odors for most of it's other purposes, too. If you prefer a powder, and do not like the idea of baking soda, try straight cornstarch or cornstarch based after shower shake-on powders.

        Reply
      • Guest
        randy on #6296

        HI
        Basically both have similar usage, i.e keep skin dry, absorb moisture, prevent sweat and mask unwanted odour,But keeping up with fashion trends, over years, people have come to prefer deodorants over talcum powder. Talcum powder only absorbs moisture preventing any potential fungal infections in which it is only really applicable to babies normally it doesn't act on skin, however a deodorant is used to reduce or mask body odour. Recently there are antiperspirants which stop or reduce sweating.

        Reply
      • Guest
        harley on #6595

        hi!
        For me, If you use enough baby powder instead of deodorant, you will stay dry and give of a possibly pleasant baby powder smell. Because you’re staying dry, you shouldn’t build up much sweat, which means you’re not going to develop much of a bad smell either. There are claims that some of the ingredients in some deodorants may be harmful to your health, whether or not this is true I don’t know. Using baby powder may be healthier. On the other hand, if powder is sufficient to eliminate body odor you may be just fine without using anything. You can potentially skip the deodorant when the weather is cool and/or you will not be doing anything strenuous.

        Reply
      • Guest
        leonard on #6596

        hello,
        If you’re “extremely” active or don’t put on enough baby powder, you’ll sweat away the powder and then you’ll smell both like sweat but also baby powder, probably not too pleasant.I don’t think baby powder does a good enough job long enough to compete with a standard deodorant (I don’t use antiperspirants). The only caution I’d suggest is that women should be somewhat cautious because there has been some research that talcum-based powder use has been connected to ovarian cancer. If that is a concern for you, there are cornstarch-based powders which good alternatives. I hope this would help. Thanks a lot.

        Reply
      • Guest
        brantley on #6861

        hi,
        I Spoke to doctor about it as it was making me very self conscious and got a hydrol forte from a pharmacist – a very, very strong anti per spirant. And it worked within days! I don't wear any other anti-per spirant or deodorant now and I don't need to. Totally dry and no smell at all – it's wonderful. I have had some problems with it…. it itches like mad when I put it on and leaves a red rash, but if it means I can go a whole day without caking myself in sprays and don't have to change my top at lunchtime I'm happy to put up with it. I know it's embarrassing to go to a doctor about but please (those who have commented recently), go and speak to a doctor or pharmacist. I've been there. I've gone through my teens totally lacking self confidence due to moderate sweating and through my 20s keeping my arms firmly by my sides due to excessive sweating. Hope you get it sorted!

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      • Guest
        Richard M on #7701

        If you use enough talcum powder instead of antiperspirant/deodorant, you will stay dry and give off a possibly pleasant powder smell. Because you’re staying dry, you shouldn’t build up much sweat, which means you’re not going to develop much of a bad smell either. Well, this is just my own opinion.

        Personally, I don’t think baby powder does a good job long enough to compete with a standard deodorant (I don’t use antiperspirants). The only caution I’d suggest is that women should become cautious because there has been some research that talcum-based powder use has been connected to ovarian cancer. If that is a concern for you, there are cornstarch-based powders which I think are good alternatives.

        Reply
      • Guest
        William Kuh on #8384

        Yes you can but it is not that effective based on my experience. Even though talcum powder can help in managing some of the symptoms associated with excessive sweating, it is not as effective as some other over-the-counter topical treatments. People use talcum powder to manage excessive sweat because it is both astringent and absorbent. When you apply talcum powder to your skin it absorbs extra moisture on your skin while also encouraging the skin to stay dry. But antiperspirant is much effective when we talk about hyperhidrosis.

        Reply
      • Guest
        Shawn D on #8492

        Talcum powder, While does not stop sweating as much as an antiperspirant does, is definitely a great aid against sweat. The reason is talcum powder is really absorbent. It is an astringent powder that causes body tissues to squeeze and creates a dry surface. It also has properties that minimize sweat production. Just make sure you were pat dry when you apply the talcum powder. Finally, the fragrance in most talcum powders also works wonderfully well to mask body odor. I had try the Axe Denim Cologne Talc. It gives you deodorant-like protection. It controls your body odor by absorbing extra oil secreted by the skin and provides all-day protection against sweating.

        Reply
      • Guest
        James on #9303

        Yes, and there are actually claims that some of the ingredients in some deodorants may be harmful to your health, whether or not this is true I don’t know. I just think using talcum powder may be healthier. On the other hand, if powder is sufficient to eliminate body odor you may be just fine without using anything. You can potentially skip the deodorant when the weather is cool and/or you will not be doing anything strenuous.

        Reply
      • Guest
        Mara on #9797

        Short answer is yes. But does baby powder work? The powder will absorb some of your underarm perspiration. It will also help absorb and mask odor, help keep your skin cool and smooth. It will not be as effective as an antiperspirant, because it lacks ingredients like aluminum, but that means it will also be gentler on your skin. When I visit the Philippines last year there was this locally made product named Milcu, it was a talcum powder for foot and underarm. It works as deodorant and antiperspirant. It smells good and work wonders. However, it is not available here.

        Reply
      • Guest
        Claire on #9910

        Hi Mara,

        I happened to know Milcu and it really works great in managing underarm and foot sweat. Plus it also works as deodorant. It comes in powder form so I won't have to worry about the my shirt being stained. I bought it online.

        -Claire

        Reply
      • Guest
        Saul on #12726

        Talcum powder only absorbs moisture preventing any potential fungal infections. normally it doesn't act on skin however a deodorant is used to reduce or mask body odour. Recently there are anti perspirants which stop or reduce sweating.

        Reply
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