Have you tried Botox treatments?

      • Participant
        JennyDale on #808

        Was wondering if anyone here uses Botox to keep overactive sweat glands in check. I learned about this while looking for tips on how to stop underarm sweating. I might try Botox in the future, but so far the whole thing seems pricey and even potentially dangerous. Actually I am most interested in hearing about other people's experiences because I read about possible Botox side effects, and oh my the list is long! If you did it please let me know how effective it was, did you suffer any bad consequences, and how long did the effects of the treatment last? And how severe was your underarm sweating before you decided to do this? Thanks a bunch!

        • This topic was modified 8 years, 7 months ago by JennyDale.
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      • Participant
        Tim Fleiss on #815

        I had Botox injections for my axillary hyperhidrosis about two years ago. It was a one time thing and I hadn't experienced any bad side effects. I took about 25 Botox units into each armpit and the effects lasted about 5 months. Seems good, since my dose was one of the lower ones.

        Now, I don't know what your reasons are, but I'd like to point out that I only decided to use that treatment because I was in a delicate business position at the time. Usually I make do with antiperspirants, and if they don't keep excess sweating under control, spare shirts save the day. Back then I was under a lot of stress, constantly running from one meeting to another. Since I had no other idea how to stop armpit sweat, I opted for Botox. I really didn't want to be distracted by armpit sweat, and I especially didn't want to leave a bad impression on my business partners.

        My opinion: use Botox if really necessary. Otherwise, less poisonous alternatives are a better, safer choice.

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      • Participant
        Steve on #817

        I wonder why antiperspirants don't work for some people. They've always kept my excessive armpit sweating under control. Did you guys try various brands? Not everything works for everyone – maybe you just need to find your perfect match. And at least, when it comes to axillary hyperhidrosis, no one expects us to stop sweating completely – everybody has some armpit sweat!

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      • Participant
        Leb on #853

        Allegedly, Botox treatments that deal with sweaty hands can be very painful. Does anyone know about this firsthand? (Ouch, pun NOT intended!) Since hands have high concentration of nerves, the resulting pain seems likely. Apart from that, I wonder if there's a risk of permanent nerve damage? 😐
        I know, I know, you'll say I'm being paranoid. Sigh, when are they going to invent a perfect sweaty palms cure…

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      • Participant
        JennyDale on #855

        I just opened a topic in which we can rant about society's stand on excessive sweating and sweating in general. Had a big talk with my mother and she freaked out after I said I'm considering Botox treatments to deal with my armpit sweat.
        Our long conversation was a bit of a wake-up call and now I'm not so keen on filling my body with poison just to satisfy some shallow, distorted social norms. Ugh!

        Sorry, I'm having a bad day obviously. 😳 I don't want to judge anyone who did this, but I doubt I will hop on that train. Will keep looking for a different hyperhidrosis cure.

        Reply
      • Participant
        Tim Fleiss on #856

        Hey Jenny. You seem young and I agree with your mother there – it would be best to first exhaust all milder methods and see if you can find out how to stop armpit sweating with a less “toxic” method.
        That being said, “filling my body with poison” is definitely a stretch, but as you seem a bit upset I can see where it's coming from. =)
        I believe Botox is a good excessive sweating treatment in some situations. In my opinion, having various treatments to choose from can only be a good thing.

        Reply
      • Participant
        Plastic Pete on #860

        I am interested in a Botox hyperhidrosis treatment for my feet, but from what I have read, this is not usually used to treat plantar hyperhidrosis. It can be done, but takes a lot of Botox units and injections – making it costly, right?
        As for bad side effects, I guess if actors can stuff their faces with it, it is okay to use it on feet as well. Would really love to get rid of sweaty feet for a few months!

        Reply
      • Participant
        Wallace Trent on #908

        Allegedly, Botox treatments that deal with sweaty hands can be very painful. Does anyone know about this firsthand? (Ouch, pun NOT intended!) Since hands have high concentration of nerves, the resulting pain seems likely. Apart from that, I wonder if there’s a risk of permanent nerve damage?

        Sorry, no personal experience here, but I have palmar hyperhidrosis just like you, and did some research a while back on various treatments. I decided against Botox after reading that one of the side effects often includes numb hands. Apparently this can last for a few weeks and it varies in intensity. Some people have minor numbness, others can barely write.

        The number of injections can vary – some take 10, some 50… And yes, injections are said to be painful – there are various methods to numb the hands before the procedure – ice cooling is regarded to be quite effective.

        Still, Botox only numbs the hands temporarily. From what I know, the only truly irreversible treatment is a hyperhidrosis surgery.

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      • Guest
        Ced Kien on #3519

        I have tried the treatment. Injections are really painful, really, really painful.

        Reply
      • Guest
        Ivy Suarez on #3924

        I have had terrible arm pit sweating most of my life and I had tried every over the counter, clinical strength deodorant. After reading about Botox as a treatment for hyperhidrosis, I decided to go to my derma to talk about it, and to see if my insurance would cover it, (they do cover it!) So I went ahead and started the process. It was a frustrating process to get the prescription for Botox filled through a special pharmacy (mostly due to the incompetency of my doctor's office that I was going through for the Botox), but I am so glad I went through with it.
        I had 20 injections in each arm pit about a month ago. The shots really didn't hurt much, just like little tiny pricks, and I was sore for a couple of hours afterwards, but I could tell a difference in the amount of sweat I was producing in my arm pits almost immediately. I am so looking forward to finally wearing tank tops this summer and not worrying about horrible sweating, and no longer do I have embarrassing sweat stains in the pit areas of my shirts.

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      • Guest
        Menard on #3927

        I've had terrible arm pit sweating most of my life and I had tried every over the counter, clinical strength deodorant. After reading about Botox as a treatment for hyperhidrosis, I decided to go to my derma to talk about it, and to see if my insurance would cover it, (they do cover it!) So I went ahead and started the process. It was a frustrating process to get the prescription for Botox filled through a special pharmacy (mostly due to the incompetency of my doctor's office that I was going through for the Botox), but I am so glad I went through with it.
        I had 20 injections in each arm pit about a month ago. The shots really didn't hurt much, just like little tiny pricks, and I was sore for a couple of hours afterwards, but I could tell a difference in the amount of sweat I was producing in my arm pits almost immediately. I am so looking forward to finally wearing tank tops this summer and not worrying about horrible sweating, and no longer do I have embarrassing sweat stains in the pit areas of my shirts.
        I just wanted to post this in case anyone else has wondered about this procedure for hyperhidrosis.

        Reply
      • Guest
        Jonna on #5453

        Botox has been a well-accepted treatment for excessive sweating, also known as hyperhidrosis. But it can also be used for less serious cases of sweating—like mine. In fact, celebrities have been known to get a little underarm Botox before award season. Just to be clear: Sweating is an essential and totally normal bodily function that keeps humans from overheating. Botox is used as a localized treatment, so stopping the sweat in one area doesn’t affect the other areas of the body. Yes, my armpits are far less sweaty, and I no longer use deodorant.

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      • Guest
        chemay on #6187

        hi
        I'll just be at school, when i realize my whole underarm is wet, then i get conscious and keep my arms by my side because i am so worried anyone will see. I haven't tried any methods or deodorants, i only use either Lynx or Rexona [i'm a girl, i just like the smell of Lynx]. It's a big problem for me, as i have too wear the school uniform every day, and don't get to choose what type of clothes i wear. It makes me really depressed. I always seem to smell, and it grosses me out, I even have to bring my deodorant to school everyday and spray myself at least 5 times in the day. Any suggestions, I'm sick of the sweating.

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      • Guest
        jasper on #6297

        Botox is one of the most common nonsurgical cosmetic procedures. Because of its popularity, Botox is often performed in non medical settings. However, it is very important that you receive Botox injections from a trained and experienced health care professional in a sterile, well-equipped medical facility to avoid unwanted effects. This is used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including eye squints, migraines, excess sweating, and leaky bladders.

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      • Guest
        jane on #6440

        I've had sweaty armpits, hands and feet since I was teen. Since then my life has been a struggle everyday trying to find something that can help me. I'm not sure if its related to anxiety, nervousness or simply just being hot and unable to tolerate it. I fear touching people or shaking hands. It's a big problem for me. I always gave to keep a fan on and keep a cup of ice water so that I can cool myself and control it a little bit. I've used prescription antiperspirants as well as medicines but nothing works for me. I even sweat in cold weather too. I need help. This is affecting my life everyday. Does botox would be worth to try?

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      • Guest
        fiona on #6598

        hai everyone!
        If you are deciding to have a botox treatment then there might be possible side effects such as: headaches, bruising, pain at the site of injection, and, in less than 1% of cases, drooping eyelids or eyebrows that return to their natural position within a few months. Spas and parties are fun, but not for injections. These wrinkle treatment should only be done by a doctor who is board-certified in dermatology or plastic surgery. If you're breastfeeding, pregnant, or plan to become pregnant, the FDA recommends that you talk to your doctor before starting Botox, Dysport, or Xeomin. Hope this would help!

        Reply
      • Guest
        lyric on #6865

        -hai,
        Though excessive underarm sweat isn't serious or life-threatening, it can be embarrassing and makes me uncomfortable and anxious. I have suffered with this problem for my entire life and endured countless embarrassing situations. My palms were so wet paper. My under arms are continually damp and smell after a short period of time. I have had a bi-lateral sympathectomy and several botox treatments but so far it did not last that long the odour and sweating did not stop. Do you have some effective suggestions? Thanks.

        Reply
      • Guest
        Mary Lou Goodacre on #6941

        I’ve have 2 treatments in the last year for craniofacial hyperhydrosis. Each time they surgacevfrize the top and sides of my head with ice packs than injected Botox ($1000 worth, every inch or so across the crown of my head all the wY to the hairline. It hurts and although it works for a few months, I find it ‘pools’ over your eyebrows making it hard to open your eyes wide or put on mascara. I’m not doing it again and will either use a liquid concoction for specific events or ditopan for longer term use.

        Reply
      • Guest
        Jay Parkar on #7056

        I am interested in a Botox treatment for my feet, but from what I have read, there is some side effect so how to treat them effectively?

        Reply
      • Guest
        Jessica on #7700

        I don't have any wrinkles and I've had Botox twice because I was trying to smell better.

        I've had hyperhidrosis, or excessive sweating. It's embarrassing and not easy to treat. After trying prescription deodorants with no success, I went to my doctor to see if a few shots of Botox might dry up my underarms. We discussed the problem. I forked over $500.

        The sweating doesn't shift to other body parts. This is the first concern I hear from non-Botox users, but I have not experienced more sweating in other areas of the body after getting the injections. The only effect is in the areas where you're injected. I had some swelling on the area.

        Reply
      • Guest
        Grace on #7810

        Having excessive sweating is very embarrassing and depressing because people around me always mistook it for poor hygiene. I would only wear dark colored shirts to hide those excessive sweating.

        The first treatment I used was using antiperspirant deodorant spray that recommended by our family friend. But when it didn't work, I decided to go on and meet with a Dermatologist.

        Dermatologists are using Botulinum toxin or Botox injections to treat Hyperhidrosis.

        The dermatologist first determines the severity of my excessive sweating.

        Though this treatment is expensive, (about $1,000 for both underarms) but this is really worth it. The effect of this treatment holds for 6 months.

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